Haiku for an electromagnetic wave

Image: Mike Tarbutt, roses in Brighton

Here, physicists and a few others reveal the many ways we think of the electromagnetic wave - this phenomenon that is ubiquitous, but so abstractly understood.

At the ancient pond

a frog plunges into

the sound of water

 - Matsuo Bashō (1644 - 1694)

Haiku are the world's shortest poems, usually consisting of less than 17 syllables and arranged in a sequence approximating to 5-7-5. They have their origins in 12th century Japan.  In all their brevity, haiku tell a story and paint a vivid picture, leaving it up to the audience to complete them in their mind's eye. A great haiku presents a crystalline moment of image, emotion, and awareness. Elements of  compassion, silence, and a sense of temporality can be combined to reveal a quality of mystery. Haiku often contain a hidden dualism - the near and the far, the past and present, sound and silence, temporality, and eternity and also have a seasonal tie-in, as well as specific word-images that reveal deeper layers. The haiku format bears resemblance to an equation with its compact and formal structure capable of capturing an infinite world of experience. 

 

Friday
Jun222012

Ana Jofre

did you ever see

electromagnetic waves

vibrating atoms?

 

Ana Jofre is an artist and physicist at the University of North Carolina in Charlotte, USA


Friday
Jun222012

Andrew Jaffe

the oldest light

traces the history

of the universe

 

Andrew Jaffe is a cosmologist and astrophysicist at Imperial College. He is currently building a time machine with one collaborator and another with 400 others, deciphering signals from the early Universe received by the Planck Surveyor Satellite


Tuesday
Jun262012

Anonymous

Light stops at c’s shore

waves she fears, inside shes waves

inside she wavers

 

Go ride with some light

Be everywhere instantly

Relatively here

 

Would you be puzzled

By quantum entanglement

If you were photons?

 

Anonymous is a theoretical physicist 

 

Friday
Jun222012

Arthur Turrell

World travels by light

close buoying marbles weaving

unsure of their flight

 

Arthur Turrell, Plasma Physics Group, Imperial College


Friday
Jun222012

Dave Clements

Chasing waves of light

They always escape at c

Relativity

 

Hard sharp X-ray light.

Long languorous radio.

Visible - just right.

 

David L. Clements is an observer of our universe working mainly on extragalactic astronomy and observational cosmology at Imperial College. He also occasionally writes science fiction and has appeared inAnalog, Nature Futures and a number of anthologies, including the forthcoming, 'One Weird Idea'.  He also  teaches aspiring sci fi writers about physics.


Friday
Jun222012

David Herrera Marti

the leaves remain,

fading memory

will it ever come back?

 

David Herrera Martí is working on his PhD in Quantum Information at Imperial College


Friday
Jun222012

Geraldine Cox

like rain this strange wave

tiny drop of energy

colour of a rose

 

green leaf

 

sleepless in darkness

message from America

i reveal you

 

Geraldine Cox is artist in residence at Imperial College Physics Department

 

Friday
Jun222012

Henrik Jeldtoft Jensen

Empty space
  

Electrowave

Empty space empty nowhere

 

Massive tree

My way blocked

Electrowave indifferent

 

Henrik Jeldtoft Jensen Professor of Mathematical Physics, Department of Mathematics and Complexity & Networks Group, Imperial College London


Friday
Jun222012

Louisa Gilder

1834:

James, at three, "investigates

the hidd'n course of streams..."

 

1864:

Maxwell's silver hammer strikes

truth beneath the waves

 

Louisa is the author of 'The Age of Entanglement', she lives in Tyringham, Western Massachusetts


Friday
Jun222012

Mike Tarbutt

Star burst; later,

Time-tempered ripples break

Lightly at my shore.

 

Michael Tarbutt is a physicist at Imperial College


Friday
Jun222012

Ray Rivers

minute medium

waiting for my hot coffee

the microwave pings

 

100; Gigahertz,

the birth of the universe;

Megahertz - Fox News

 

Ray Rivers is Emeritus Professor in Theoretical Physics at Imperial College

 

Friday
Jun222012

Roberto Trotta

vibrating void

silent flash

caressing

Maxwell's beard

 

Roberto Trotta is a cosmologist in the astrophysics group of Imperial College


Friday
Jun222012

Slappy

sweet, orthogonal

oscillations, no need for

fictional aether

 

Slappy has just completed undergraduate physics at the University of North Carolina in Charlotte, USA and is about to go into graduate school to study cognitive science